About Us

The Nuclear Physics with Lattice Quantum Chromo Dynamics (NPLQCD) collaboration was formed in 2006 with the goal of using lattice QCD to calculate hadronic interactions and other observables relevant to nuclear physics.

NPLQCD is an US-European collaboration who has received computational resources from a number of organizations. These include USQCD, NERSC and Teragrid in the US, PRACE and RES in Europe. We have also run in local clusters located at the University of Washington, College of William and Mary, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the University of New Hampshire.

Our collaboration brings together expertise in numerical algorithms, programming languages, operating systems, lattice field theory, and particle and nuclear physics.

Silas R. Beane is Professor of Physics at the University of Washington. Emmanuel Chang is Post-doctoral Researcher at the University of Washington. Zohreh Davoudi is Assistant Professor at the University of Maryland. William Detmold is Assistant Professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Kostas Orginos is Professor pf Physics at the College of William and Mary and Staff Scientist at the Jefferson Laboratory. Assumpta Parreño is Associate Professor of Physics at the University of Barcelona. Martin Savage is Professor of Physics at the Institute for Nuclear Theory, Seattle. Phiala Shanahan is Assistant Professor at the College of William and Mary. Brian Tiburzi is Assistant Professor at the City College of New York. Michael Wagman is Pappalardo Fellow in Physics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Frank Winter is Staff Scientist at Jefferson Laboratory.



Who we are

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From left to right:
Silas R. Beane (U of Washington), Emmanuel Chang (U of Washington),
Zohreh Davoudi (U of Maryland), William Detmold (MIT), Kostas Orginos (William & Mary and TJNAF),
Assumpta ParreƱo (U of Barcelona), Martin J. Savage (Institute for Nuclear Theory),
Phiala Shanahan (William & Mary), Brian Tiburzi (City College of New York),
Michael Wagman (MIT), Frank Winter (TJNAF).